Airplane Food Circa 1963

English: A TWA Douglas DC-3 airplane is prepar...

English: A TWA Douglas DC-3 airplane is prepared for takeoff from Columbus, Ohio. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I must digress, as I have done before, to give more ambient recollections to  hopefully set the mood  for future food experiences. Airline food and Automat food were my first experiences  of  Mass produced food.  The food served on airplanes was another epiphany for me . After my “extensive” experience traveling  coast to coast,  I thought I had become a food connoisseur and  was ready to pass judgement upon the Airlines offerings. I had heard stories of things  going either way.  My conclusion after this trip was the airline served delicious meals-better than today’s  airline meals. I had not yet experienced the foods of Saigon, Dumaguete and Bangkok, which would seriously impact ratings of Airline fare in the future. Whether served in first class or coach all dishes, plates and bowls were made of plastic. The  meals  served to passengers on board were hot meals . The first kitchens preparing meals in-flight were established by United Airlines in 1936. Today the type of food varies depending upon the airline company and class of travel. That did not  appear to be the case during my travels in South East Asia. Meals were served on a tray  and with metal cutlery, and glassware .The airline dinner typically included meat (most commonly chicken or beef ) a salad, vegetable,  a roll with butter  and a dessert. My favorite at the time was Salisbury Steak. French dressing on the salad, green beans and pound cake. Our mother allowed  us to have tea and I liked mine with cream and sugar. Condiments were supplied (typically salt, pepper and sugar)  in small sachets. For cleanliness most meals came with a napkin and a moist towelette. The stewardesses were attentive, paying special attention to the small  “civilians” on this flight carrying mostly young soldiers to an undetermined future.

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